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How To Winterize Your House: 5 Simple Ways to Prepare for the Cold

Home Winterization Tips The colder it gets outside, the more likely you are to start feeling cabin fever. And while indoor heat is convenient and makes us feel safe from the elements, it also keeps us from taking advantage of them. Keeping your house cool in the summer and warm in the winter can be challenging, especially if you live in an older home that shows its age with slow leaks and drafty windows. Fortunately, there are simple things you can do now to make sure your home is ready for colder months ahead. You don’t need to wait until spring just to get started on maintenance. Read on for 7 tips on how to winterize your house so that it’s ready when the temperature drops.

Preparing your home for winter

Leaks can be found in many different places – in windows and doors, in the roof, and even on the outside. To tackle these issues, you need to start with an inspection of your home. The most obvious place to find leaks are on your roof. If you spot a leak, or have any doubts about its size, it’s time to call a professional to assess the damage. Next up is winterizing your home by investing in adequate insulation. Having proper insulation will help keep your house cooler in summer and warmer in winter. For example, if you have insulated windows that are drafty or poorly sealed around the window frames, it’s time for them to get replaced. As for keeping water from building up inside during the winter months, consider installing weather-stripping around exterior doors and windows (like rubber seals). Weather-stripping prevents cold air from entering through gaps between walls and floors as well as excessive condensation buildup by stopping air flow into cold rooms. By preparing for winter now, you’ll save yourself money down the line!

Insulate any exterior pipes

Old homes can have a variety of problems. One of those problems, especially in old homes, is the pipes. In order to prevent them from freezing or bursting, you should insulate any exterior water pipes that are exposed to cold weather. This includes the entrance points of your home’s plumbing system as well as any other areas that your home may need to maintain temperature in case of an emergency. You could also insulate your home’s irrigation and sprinkler systems if you live in a warmer state with colder winters or if you have some sort of landscape such as plants or trees that require a lot of water.

Install insulated covers on exterior faucets

Make sure your faucets are sealed with insulating covers. This can help prevent the heat from escaping, which will keep your home both warmer and colder. Faucet Cover Installation

Ensure proper drainage by having your gutters cleaned and downspouts extended

If your gutters are clogged with leaves and debris, they won’t be able to do their job. As such, you need to take care of them before winter weather sets in. If you don’t have an accumulation of debris in your gutters, you can save yourself the hassle of hiring a professional service by cleaning it yourself. The next step is to extend the downspouts from the roof so that water flows away from your house more efficiently. This will help prevent overflowing into the foundation and melting snow and ice from building up on your property.

Install weather stripping around windows and doors

Aside from windows, you can also install weather stripping on your doors by cutting off excess length of the door trim and then flipping it up to cover the threshold. Allowing heat to escape through your house’s entryways is one way that you could end up with a drafty home or an air conditioner that constantly needs to work harder during the winter months. Weather stripping is a simple, barrier-type material that comes in a variety of materials and it’s often installed around doors to help keep the heat in. Aside from windows, you can also install weather stripping on your doors by cutting off excess length of the door trim and then flipping it up to cover the threshold. Allowing heat to escape through your house’s entryways is one way that you could end up with a drafty home or an air conditioner that constantly needs to work harder during the winter months. Install Weatherstripping

If you have a fireplace, have it professionally cleaned

Make sure that your fireplace is in good shape first. A professional cleaning, if needed, can help ensure you’re safe and warm this winter. Chimney Sweep

Check for any openings that animals can enter, and close them

Animals are drawn to warm, cozy places in the winter, making it important to close up any openings they can use to get inside. First, make sure you check for any gaps near your door that animals could use to enter your bedroom or home office. You should also make sure any windows or doors in your house are securely closed and locked. If you have pets, then take extra precautions by checking for any holes that animals could squeeze through in the walls near the floorboards. Animals tend to find these holes when they’re looking for food and water throughout the year.

Add insulation in your attic to prevent ice dams

Insulation is an important part of winterizing your home. Insulation can come in the form of fiberglass, cellulose, or blown-in insulation. Depending on the type of insulation you choose, it will either lower your energy bills or provide a more efficient home. Additionally, insulation prevents condensation from forming on windows and walls and gives your house a cozy feel even when it’s cold outside. One way to insulate your attic is by adding rigid foam insulation in all rafters and walls. This insulation can block up to 40 percent of heat loss caused by air leakage into your attic, which keeps warm air near the ceiling where it belongs!

Your House with Insulation

If you’re looking for an easy way to winterize your home, insulation is a good place to start. It can be costly, but it’s worth it because not only is insulating your home better for the environment, it also helps prevent drafts and cold spots. The next step on your list should be wrapping up your house in plastic sheeting. A typical roll of plastic sheeting will cost about $30-$40 and will help protect items from outside damage as well as cut down on drafts. For added protection, consider using tarps or drop cloths which are easier and more effective than traditional plastic sheeting.

Wrapping up

Weather stripping is a simple, barrier-type material that comes in a variety of materials and it’s often installed around doors to help keep the heat in. Aside from windows, you can also install weather stripping on your doors by cutting off excess length of the door trim and then flipping it up to cover the threshold. Allowing heat to escape through your house’s entryways is one way that you could end up with a drafty home or an air conditioner that constantly needs to work harder during the winter months.